Color Coding for Health

Color coding is not just important for hospitals and assisted living facilities. How about schools, offices and factories? Is it any less important in those facilities to keep cleaning materials used in restrooms separate from those used in the cafeteria? Of course not!

  1. Contract cleaners can demonstate their ability to clean for health in a highly visual way
  2. School systems can identify the color coding system in posters placed where staff and students can see and support
  3. In factories where turnover in cleaning personel is high, color-coding assists in training
Saturday
Jul072012

Microfiber Cleans Best When Used with Knowledge

Rubbermaid HYGEN microfiber clothMicrofiber is an outstanding cleaning technology when used to best advantage. The micro-fine "hooks" formed in the construction process can latch onto particles on surfaces that cotton just slides over. On the microscopic level, a look at even a hard surface such as porcelain reveals a very uneven, alien surface full of potholes, nooks and crannies. Most "hard surfaces" look more like an English muffin when viewed through a scanning electron microscope.

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Friday
Dec302011

Revisiting the Much-Maligned Multifold; Eight Reasons They're Still Great

"Doctor, I still like folded towels better than roll towels. Is there something wrong with me?"Here's a quick rundown of eight reasons we think the multifold is more economical in relation to its sometimes harsher, less absorbent cousins - roll towels - than current published materials might indicate. For a more detailed guide to some opinions on this topic, click here for"Doctor, Is it Okay that I Like Multifold Towels?"

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Friday
Oct212011

Janitorial Near Top of Labor Department's Most-Injured List

The U.S. Department of Labor reports something worth noting in your cleaning regimen. Custodial workers end up making a lot of the insurance claims for work-related injuries in the United States. They rank fifth among all the worker groups identified by the Department.

The good news is, there has been a lot of attention paid to ergonomics, chemistry makeup and noise/decibel levels of equipment in recent years.

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Tuesday
Aug302011

Five Critical Elements of Better Infection Control for Your Cleaning Department

Whether facing a localized outbreak of MRSA, a regional outbreak of viral meningitis or a global outbreak of pandemic influenza, cleaners can play an important front-line role in containing the spread. But even more important than that, custodial and janitorial staffs play an important daily role in health. 

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Wednesday
Aug172011

Reduce Cleaning Cost Inside Your Facility by Keeping Dirt and Germs Outside

Sand, grit, dirt, rocks, mud, oil and ice melt chemistry are murder on floors. The answer is to stop them in their tracks.Fall and winter weather in most states means rain and snow. Tracked across parking lots, mud, dirt, soil, oil, ice melt formulations and grit end up inside your building. Once inside, they wreak havoc on floor finishes and carpet. The further they travel into your building, the more expensive they are  remove. 

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Wednesday
Aug172011

When Was Your Last Janitorial Staff Training in Bloodborne Pathogens?

HOSPECO, blood spill clean-up kitThere are two sides to the OSHA coin when it comes to training of janitorial staffs in BBP, or bloodborne pathogens. The Federal Code, 29 CFR 1910.1030, has not changed recently. So in this letter of interpretation, dated April 17, 1992, regarding 29 CFR 1910.1030, supervisors of custodial staffs might take comfort in this excerpt:

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Monday
Aug152011

Color Coding Microfiber Helps Facilities Stop Cross-Contamination and HAIs

Hospitals and assisted living facilities are more immersed in fighting infection than any other industries for two important reasons. First, their responsibility and their oath is to help their patients and residents. They are a caring industry.

Second, they have bottom lines like other businesses, and hospital-acquired infections are very expensive. More recent changes to medicare and medicaid payment regulations make HAIs more likely to be the hospital's responsibility. If there is a lawsuit, the hospital or care facility is usually the main liable entity with the deepest pockets. If there are inspection issues, the expense is that of the hospital or care facility. If there are image issues, the potential loss is that of the facility.

So medical care facilities of all kinds have responded to increasing superbugs with broader ranges of approaches including, but not limited to:

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